Does Government-forced Open-access Help Science?

As scientists along with government officials in the House and Senate work to pass bills that force government-funded research to be freely accessible, one question pops to mind: Will peer review–the principal standard in scientific research–work with open-access?

With current subscription based journals, the publication process involves an editor, who is paid, a number of reviewers, who are not paid, and a boat-load of people formatting, producing and distributing the content–all paid. With open-access format, how do publications get reviewed or formatted or distributed? At the very least someone needs to coordinate reviewers maintain a website.

Will the government finance current publishers or will government-funded research go strictly in government-funded journals? Since most research is funded by government grants–judging from the funding sources listed at the end of academic papers–the later would force many publishers out of business. The specificity of smaller journals would be lost, and all research may get lumped together–though I suppose they’d separate fields like physics and psychology. Publishers, of course, are calling the open-access bills “unnecessary and a waste of federal resources.”

And who would keep track of citations? Right now, there is an intricate bookkeeping system keeping track of citations for each author–for a fun dick-measuring game of who has the most citations–and an overall “impact factor” of the journal–another game to see which journal is most cited. Though I call these games, keeping track of citations is important. It (kind of) shows which scientists and journals publish meaningful work.

While I like the idea of open-access–in a romantic sense–I’m not sure it is compatible with the current structure of scientific publication. If these bills pass, a dramatic overhaul of the entire system will have to occur. If–or when–that happens, we must preserve the peer review process even if all else is lost.